The House With Many Stories

There is more to “form truly follows function” in this quaint 130 square meter Scandinavian house in Lipa

 

Tucked away in the heart of Lipa, Batangas, lies a true gem of the modernist movement. Designed by partners Rosalinda Manduriao and Honey Mutia of Desaurum Co., the Scandinavian-themed home of Johann Pio Lantin and Andrea Paz Rodelas stands as a true example of form follows function.

“Our design philosophy highlights the function than aesthetics,” says Honey. “However, if you can do away without compromising both of them, better!” she continues. In designing this modest space, the duo considered the needs of the family as their guiding principle.

scandinavian home
The drama of black and white is heightened by the use of different patterns and textures

 

scandinavian home

scandinavian house
A mauve upholstered accent chair and black metal wire side table, complemented by quirky wooden honeycomb shelves were used for the house’s waiting area

 

The house was given as a gift to Cynthia Rodelas, Andrea’s mom, by her husband as a silver wedding anniversary gift. “I thought it would be great to have my daughter use the house when she got married,” Cynthia says. “That way, they would have more time to save while they start their lives as newly weds,” she continues. Cynthia enlisted the interior designers’ services to actualize the modernist vision for this home, carefully intertwining the design with the spirited vibe of her daughter and son-in-law.  

To cater to the dynamic taste of the young couple, the designers fill the spaces with design elements that call to mind images of nature and purity bathed in generous amounts of natural lighting. Originally planned to be a guest house that partly served to be a storeroom for the family, there were a number of structural changes that happened in the design process.

scandinavian home
This Scandinavian-themed masters bedroom features a tufted monochrome bed and a dark wood side table, complemented with yellow and green accents

 

scandinavian house
The owners chose a fun pattern detail for the bathroom tiles as a contrast to the bathroom’s overall monochromatic color scheme

 

“Part of this 130sqm house was used as a bodega for the items the family sells so we had to tear down walls to open up the space more,” states Honey. Instead of bold and striking hues, Rosalinda and Honey stayed faithful to a monochromatic scheme. The gradients of gray ranging from slate, graphite, and charcoal veered away from being clinical and rendered a dose of personality. Enlivening greens and wood elements were incorporated to make the spaces more warm and inviting.

Due to issues with space, the designers made sure that every area and corner served an intended function. Space-saving techniques were also done to increase storage. In the bathroom, the mirror conceals a medicine cabinet, while the the area under the sink serves to keep toiletries and bath supplies.

 

scandinavian home
Even the floor carries visual interest with the use of ceramic tiles against dark wood floors

 

scandinavian house
Plants are found throughout the house to freshen the interiors

 

The space was designed so efficiently that it actually allowed for a spacious kitchen, breakfast nook, a dining area, and even a guest room. In the guest bathroom, textures and patterns play against each other making for a more exciting design experience. Carefully chosen bath fixtures seem to add sparkle.

In this open concept living area, the kitchen flows freely in to the dining area delineated only by a breakfast counter that can also serve as a prep area or buffet should the young couple decide to entertain. Black and white cabinets in different finishes add to the modern graphic appeal of the home.

scandinavian home
A large mirror is placed opposite the sliding doors to bring the outdoors in. The gold tone of the patterned wall gives the space a luxurious feeling and breaks the monotony of all the black elements

 

scandinavian home
A cantilevered countertop is a design element dating as far back as the 1970s. The floating bar provides an extra counter space without the visual clutter

 

Rosalinda points out that there used to be a sliding door that separated the kitchen but they decided to move it to the dining area instead. The glass doors open up to the courtyard, giving the homeowners the choice to expand their entertainment area to the outside or keep it intimate inside.

Professional designers rule over design elements. Their extensive training allows to actualize even the most impossible feat. As this home proves, a modernist sensibility requires having a vision and the creativity like that of Rosa and Honey, and the willingness of the homeowners to have a healthy collaboration to rise above the challenge of lack of space.